Share :

Monuments and visits

Thanks to its strategic geographical location, close to the harbour of Toulon and Marseille, many military buildings such as the Balaguier museum, the Cap Nègre battery and the Fortin de la Coudoulière have been built along the coast.

Discover also the religious buildings which during the centuries and architectural epochs were erected in our communes: the charming chapel of Pépiole, the Church Saint Laurent or the Collegiale St Pierre, and many others.

Stroll in the typical districts built by the great builders or architects like Michel Pacha in Tamaris or Fernand Pouillon in Sablettes, discover the museums, the thematic houses...
46 results
Sort :
La Seyne-sur-Mer
Course museum of a dozen panels dedicated to the memory of the shipyards of La Seyne departing from the Shipyard gate to the bascule bridge.
Ollioules
Municipal museum retracing the history of the school in France since the Ancien Régime in the 1950s.
Ollioules
Medieval building, first mentioned in 1096. Extended in the 14th century by the addition of 2 side naves, then in the 17th century by the addition of chapels, all the additions were remarkably ...
Saint-Mandrier-sur-Mer
In 1845 a small chapel was built in the hollow Saint Georges. The same year it became the parish church.
La Seyne-sur-Mer
On the site of Lazaret Bay, in the Tamaris district, stands the villa of Robert Rougeul, an engineer of arts and manufacturing and director of the Port-de-Bouc shipyards.
La Seyne-sur-Mer
Free guided visits on appointment. Equipment relative to the steam and electrical traction and signalling.
La Seyne-sur-Mer
Built between 1672 and 1680, then enhanced by Vauban to complete the defence of the harbour.
Saint-Mandrier-sur-Mer
Two lids of sarcophagi unearthed in 1816 at the priory of Saint Mandrier and stored at Sainte-Anne Hospital were returned to the town of origin. No registration will however appear on the headstones. ...
Saint-Mandrier-sur-Mer
St Louis chapel (1830) is listed on the Inventory of Historical Monuments.
La Seyne-sur-Mer
Characteristic of the style Louis XIII revisited at the Belle Epoque. At the time of the shipyards, workers would pass under this arch of white stones and pink bricks to return to their workshops.